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7:30 PM

Beethoven’s Fifth with Eschenbach

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Christoph Eschenbach - Conductor
Alisa Weilerstein - Cello
Weber - Overture to Der Freischütz
Schumann - Cello Concerto
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 5

Christoph Eschenbach returns to Verizon Hall with a passionate program featuring Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

 
2:00 PM

Beethoven’s Fifth with Eschenbach

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Christoph Eschenbach - Conductor
Alisa Weilerstein - Cello
Weber - Overture to Der Freischütz
Schumann - Cello Concerto
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 5

“There is no question that his whole heart is in what he’s doing,” says the Washington Post of Christoph Eschenbach, and that heart will be on full display when our former music director returns to lead the Philadelphians. Cello virtuoso Alisa Weilerstein (“truly a phenomenon”—The Telegraph) brings her incredible musicality to bear on Schumann’s Cello Concerto. Never performed during the composer’s lifetime, this intensely personal work now lives in the pantheon of cello compositions. From its indelible four-note opening to the rousing finale, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony never fails to enthrall. Der Freischütz (The Freeshooter) was a triumph for Carl Maria von Weber; the Overture alone makes clear why the work inspired composers from Wagner to Berlioz.

 
11:30 AM

Bernstein: 100 Years Young

11:30 AM, Verizon Hall
Kensho Watanabe - Conductor

Celebrate Leonard Bernstein's 100th birthday with your whole family! Bernstein’s daughter Jamie carries on his tradition of inspiring young listeners at our next Family Concert with a guided tour of her father's youthful works.

 
8:00 PM

Beethoven’s Fifth with Eschenbach

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Christoph Eschenbach - Conductor
Alisa Weilerstein - Cello
Weber - Overture to Der Freischütz
Schumann - Cello Concerto
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 5

“There is no question that his whole heart is in what he’s doing,” says the Washington Post of Christoph Eschenbach, and that heart will be on full display when our former music director returns to lead the Philadelphians. Cello virtuoso Alisa Weilerstein (“truly a phenomenon”—The Telegraph) brings her incredible musicality to bear on Schumann’s Cello Concerto. Never performed during the composer’s lifetime, this intensely personal work now lives in the pantheon of cello compositions. From its indelible four-note opening to the rousing finale, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony never fails to enthrall. Der Freischütz (The Freeshooter) was a triumph for Carl Maria von Weber; the Overture alone makes clear why the work inspired composers from Wagner to Berlioz.

 
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7:30 PM

Mozart and Mahler

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla - Conductor
Menahem Pressler - Piano
Janai Brugger - Soprano
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488
INTERMISSION -
Mahler - Symphony No. 4

Online exchanges are not currently available for this concert. please email patronservices@philorch.org or call 215.893.1999 to exchange your tickets.

Out of respect for the safety of our patrons, the Thursday, February 8, 2018, 7:30 PM performance of Mozart and Mahler has been canceled. This decision was made after evaluating numerous factors related to the Eagles Super Bowl Parade that would make it challenging for our patrons and Orchestra musicians to attend the concert. The Friday matinee and Saturday evening performances of this program will go on as planned.

 
2:00 PM

Mozart and Mahler

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla - Conductor
Menahem Pressler - Piano
Janai Brugger - Soprano
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488
INTERMISSION -
Mahler - Symphony No. 4

Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla has taken the symphonic world by storm; she was just 29 years old when she became music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony in 2016. (The Guardian: Her “combination of precision, poise and power is remarkable.”) Hear what all the well-deserved excitement is about as she makes her Philadelphia Orchestra debut. Pianist Menahem Pressler also made an important debut here in Philadelphia: After fleeing Nazi Germany with his family, he gave his first American performances with Eugene Ormandy in 1947 at the age of 23. In the 70 years since, he’s toured the world as a leading soloist and founder of the revered Beaux Arts Trio. Mahler’s Fourth Symphony is based on one of his own songs, an ethereal depiction of a child’s vision of paradise. Heavenly!

 
8:00 PM

Mozart and Mahler

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla - Conductor
Menahem Pressler - Piano
Janai Brugger - Soprano
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488
INTERMISSION -
Mahler - Symphony No. 4

Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla has taken the symphonic world by storm; she was just 29 years old when she became music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony in 2016. (The Guardian: Her “combination of precision, poise and power is remarkable.”) Hear what all the well-deserved excitement is about as she makes her Philadelphia Orchestra debut. Pianist Menahem Pressler also made an important debut here in Philadelphia: After fleeing Nazi Germany with his family, he gave his first American performances with Eugene Ormandy in 1947 at the age of 23. In the 70 years since, he’s toured the world as a leading soloist and founder of the revered Beaux Arts Trio. Mahler’s Fourth Symphony is based on one of his own songs, an ethereal depiction of a child’s vision of paradise. Heavenly!

 
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7:30 PM

Joshua Bell and Yannick

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Joshua Bell - Violin
Wieniawski - Violin Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION -
Shostakovich - Symphony No. 7 ("Leningrad")

Joshua Bell first captivated Philadelphia audiences and then the world with his astonishing prowess, on full display in this series of concerts centered on St. Petersburg, Russia. Bell performs Wieniawski’s romantic and Paganini-like Violin Concerto No. 2, premiered while the composer and violinist was living and teaching in St. Petersburg. The Concerto exhibits a glossy nostalgia in stark contrast to Shostakovich’s emotionally charged work dedicated to the same great Russian city. The “Leningrad” Symphony is a vivid depiction of invading armies and the devastating impact of war. Yannick leads the Orchestra for three performances of Shostakovich’s towering masterpiece.

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2:00 PM

Joshua Bell and Yannick

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Joshua Bell - Violin
Wieniawski - Violin Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION -
Shostakovich - Symphony No. 7 ("Leningrad")

Joshua Bell first captivated Philadelphia audiences and then the world with his astonishing prowess, on full display in this series of concerts centered on St. Petersburg, Russia. Bell performs Wieniawski’s romantic and Paganini-like Violin Concerto No. 2, premiered while the composer and violinist was living and teaching in St. Petersburg. The Concerto exhibits a glossy nostalgia in stark contrast to Shostakovich’s emotionally charged work dedicated to the same great Russian city. The “Leningrad” Symphony is a vivid depiction of invading armies and the devastating impact of war. Yannick leads the Orchestra for three performances of Shostakovich’s towering masterpiece.

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These concerts will be LiveNote enabled.

 
8:00 PM

Joshua Bell and Cristi

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Joshua Bell - Violin
Beethoven - Leonore Overture No. 3
Wieniawski - Violin Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION -
Dvorák - Symphony No. 8

Joshua Bell first captivated Philadelphia audiences and then the world with his astonishing prowess, on full display in this series of concerts centered on St. Petersburg, Russia. Bell performs Wieniawski’s romantic and Paganini-like Violin Concerto No. 2, premiered while the composer and violinist was living and teaching in St. Petersburg. Cristian Măcelaru guest conducts, pairing Bell and Wieniawski with Dvořák’s euphoric Symphony No. 8 and Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3.

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2:00 PM

Joshua Bell and Yannick

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Joshua Bell - Violin
Wieniawski - Violin Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION -
Shostakovich - Symphony No. 7 ("Leningrad")

Joshua Bell first captivated Philadelphia audiences and then the world with his astonishing prowess, on full display in this series of concerts centered on St. Petersburg, Russia. Bell performs Wieniawski’s romantic and Paganini-like Violin Concerto No. 2, premiered while the composer and violinist was living and teaching in St. Petersburg. The Concerto exhibits a glossy nostalgia in stark contrast to Shostakovich’s emotionally charged work dedicated to the same great Russian city. The “Leningrad” Symphony is a vivid depiction of invading armies and the devastating impact of war. Yannick leads the Orchestra for three performances of Shostakovich’s towering masterpiece.

LiveNote Icon

These concerts will be LiveNote enabled.

 
 
 
 
7:30 PM

Beethoven, Brahms and Brass

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Nitzan Haroz - Trombone
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Blair Bollinger - Bass trombone
Carol Jantsch - Tuba
Kodály - Dances of Marosszék
Higdon - Concerto for Low Brass
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 8
Brahms - Hungarian Dances

Once more, one of America’s most acclaimed and most frequently performed living composers, Philadelphian Jennifer Higdon, graces us with a brilliant new work, this time for those stalwarts of the brass section, the trombones and tuba. Hear them shine in this rare turn in the spotlight. Beethoven’s Eighth Symphony may seem overshadowed by the magnificent Ninth that followed, but there’s compositional genius (and humor) to burn here. Zoltán Kodály’s Dances of Marosszék are the rural counterpart of Brahms’s more urbane Hungarian Dances; they make wonderful bookends for this strikingly original program.


These concerts will be LiveNote enabled.

 
2:00 PM

Beethoven, Brahms and Brass

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Nitzan Haroz - Trombone
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Blair Bollinger - Bass trombone
Carol Jantsch - Tuba
Kodály - Dances of Marosszék
Higdon - Concerto for Low Brass
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 8
Brahms - Hungarian Dances

Once more, one of America’s most acclaimed and most frequently performed living composers, Philadelphian Jennifer Higdon, graces us with a brilliant new work, this time for those stalwarts of the brass section, the trombones and tuba. Hear them shine in this rare turn in the spotlight. Beethoven’s Eighth Symphony may seem overshadowed by the magnificent Ninth that followed, but there’s compositional genius (and humor) to burn here. Zoltán Kodály’s Dances of Marosszék are the rural counterpart of Brahms’s more urbane Hungarian Dances; they make wonderful bookends for this strikingly original program.


These concerts will be LiveNote enabled.

 
8:00 PM

Beethoven, Brahms and Brass

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Cristian Macelaru - Conductor
Nitzan Haroz - Trombone
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Blair Bollinger - Bass trombone
Carol Jantsch - Tuba
Kodály - Dances of Marosszék
Higdon - Concerto for Low Brass
INTERMISSION -
Beethoven - Symphony No. 8
Brahms - Hungarian Dances

Once more, one of America’s most acclaimed and most frequently performed living composers, Philadelphian Jennifer Higdon, graces us with a brilliant new work, this time for those stalwarts of the brass section, the trombones and tuba. Hear them shine in this rare turn in the spotlight. Beethoven’s Eighth Symphony may seem overshadowed by the magnificent Ninth that followed, but there’s compositional genius (and humor) to burn here. Zoltán Kodály’s Dances of Marosszék are the rural counterpart of Brahms’s more urbane Hungarian Dances; they make wonderful bookends for this strikingly original program.


These concerts will be LiveNote enabled.

 
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Calendar

Format: 2018-10-20