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2019-20 Season Chronological Calendar

March 5, 2019

2019-20 (120th Season)

Chronological Calendar

 

(as of March 5, 2019)

 

Opening Night Concert and Gala

 

September 18 at 7:00 PM—Wednesday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Plácido Domingo Tenor

 

Plácido Domingo is a paragon of the opera world, continuing to add roles to his repertoire while amassing raves all over the world. The truly legendary Spanish tenor joins Yannick and the Orchestra, performing beloved highlights of Italian grand opera.

Join us for this glamorous evening, celebrating a superstar of classical music, Yannick’s eighth fabulous season as music director, and the lush sounds of your Philadelphia Orchestra. Opening Night Co-Chairs Richelle Rabenou, Peter Shaw, and Assistant Principal Cello Yumi Kendall, and the Opening Night Gala Committee look forward to welcoming you to this celebratory evening with Philadelphia’s cultural leaders and arts patrons.

Contact Dorothy Byrne in the Volunteer Relations office at 215.893.3124 or via e-mail at dbyrne@philorch.org to be sure you are on the invitation list.

Concert-only tickets for the evening are available now with the purchase of a subscription. Single tickets will be available in August.

 

 Yannick and Hélène Open the Season

 

September 19 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

September 20 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

September 21 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

September 22 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Hélène Grimaud Piano

 

Coleman                                   Umoja, for orchestra—World Premiere—Philadelphia Orchestra                                Commission

Bartók                                      Piano Concerto No. 3

Dvořák                                     Symphony No. 9 (“From the New World”)

 

Umoja, a world premiere commission by American composer Valerie Coleman, launches our 2019-20 season. Ms. Coleman’s spirited music draws from Afro-Cuban, jazz, and classical genres. Umoja—meaning unity in Swahili—is alive with all these influences. Bartók’s gorgeous Third Concerto, performed by Yannick’s good friend Hélène Grimaud, is as vibrant today as the day The Philadelphia Orchestra and Eugene Ormandy gave the world premiere at the Academy of Music in 1946. This program, inspired by music of American roots, concludes with Dvořák’s wondrous “New World” Symphony.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

John Adams Conducts Adams

 

September 26 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

September 27 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

September 28 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

John Adams Conductor

Leila Josefowicz Violin

 

Ravel                                       Alborada del gracioso

Stravinsky                                Song of the Nightingale

Adams                                      Scheherazade.2, Dramatic Symphony for Violin and Orchestra—First                      Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

 

Composer, conductor, teacher, writer, thinker—John Adams is an American musical icon. His work—exciting and beautiful—unflinchingly confronts, defines, and embraces contemporary culture. He wrote Scheherazade.2 for the stellar violinist Leila Josefowicz, inspired by an art exhibit about The Tales of the Arabian Nights and Rimsky-Korsakov’s original. Josefowicz’s solo violin plays the role of a modern Scheherazade. Adams’s musical exploration of the present-day struggle of women in a patriarchal society reverses the roles, putting the woman in a position of strength. These lyrical musical threads are further evoked in Ravel’s Alborada del gracioso and Stravinsky’s Song of the Nightingale—signature works by superb composers, and each a showcase for The Philadelphia Orchestra.

 

Free College Night Concert

 

October 3 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Kensho Watanabe Conductor

 

Every year a free concert just for college students kicks off The Philadelphia Orchestra's eZseatU program, where thousands of students fill Verizon Hall to experience the famous Philadelphia Sound. A post-concert party in the Kimmel Center lobby with free food and more live music completes this festive night!

 

 

Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2

 

October 4 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 5 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Haochen Zhang Piano

 

Rachmaninoff                           Piano Concerto No. 2

Strauss                                    An Alpine Symphony

 

Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 marked the composer’s triumphant recovery from the disastrous premiere of his First Symphony. While some elements are familiar thanks to movie soundtracks and pop songs, the Concerto as a whole is a testament to Rachmaninoff’s brilliance as a composer and pianist. Haochen Zhang is a worthy interpreter of this masterwork: Not yet 30, he’s renowned for dazzling technique and thoughtful interpretation. Strauss’s Alpine Symphony was inspired by a trek up a mountain, from pre-dawn darkness to deepening nightfall. The extra large orchestra is heavy on woodwinds, brass, and percussion, the better for Strauss to evoke waterfalls, grazing cattle, and even yodels. An extraordinary work by a master of the tone poem.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

These concerts are part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 All Mozart with Yannick

 

October 10 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 13 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Juliette Kang Violin

Choong-Jin Chang Viola

 

Mozart                                      Symphony No. 35 (“Haffner”)

Mozart                                      Sinfonia concertante, for violin, viola, and orchestra

Mozart                                      Symphony No. 40

 

Yannick leads an all-Mozart program displaying the seemingly infinite range of his musical gifts. The “Haffner” Symphony, named for the commissioning Salzburg family, began as a serenade, but Mozart tweaked and enhanced it into its present form, now recognized as a true breakthrough in his musical style. The Symphony No. 40, perhaps his most famous symphony, is also hailed as a turning point in composition. In the Sinfonia concertante, a hybrid of symphony and concerto, Mozart beguiles with rich, brilliant music for both orchestra and soloists—First Associate Concertmaster Juliette Kang and Principal Viola Choong-Jin Chang.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

October 15 at 8:00 PM—Tuesday evening—Carnegie Hall

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Hélène Grimaud Piano

 

Coleman                                   Umoja, for orchestra—Philadelphia Orchestra Commission

Bartók                                      Piano Concerto No. 3

Strauss                                    An Alpine Symphony

 

Umoja, a world premiere commission by American composer Valerie Coleman, launches our 2019-20 season. Ms. Coleman’s spirited music draws from Afro-Cuban, jazz, and classical genres. Umoja—meaning unity in Swahili—is alive with all these influences. Bartók’s gorgeous Third Concerto, performed by Yannick’s good friend Hélène Grimaud, is as vibrant today as the day The Philadelphia Orchestra and Eugene Ormandy gave the world premiere at the Academy of Music in 1946. Strauss’s Alpine Symphony was inspired by a trek up a mountain, from pre-dawn darkness to deepening nightfall. The extra large orchestra is heavy on woodwinds, brass, and percussion, the better for Strauss to evoke waterfalls, grazing cattle, and even yodels. An extraordinary work by a master of the tone poem.

 

 Yannick and Mahler

 

October 17 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 18 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 19 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Louis Lortie Piano

 

Schubert/orch. Liszt                  Wanderer Fantasy, for piano and orchestra

Mahler                                      Symphony No. 5

 

Mahler summons a large orchestra to explore the full range of human emotions in his Fifth Symphony, a work that Yannick returns to with the Philadelphians for the first time in nine years. Schubert himself struggled to play the Wanderer Fantasy. More than just a technical challenge, the piece is an ingenious set of variations on the composer’s song “Der Wanderer,” transformed by Liszt into a rarely heard piano concerto. The four movements are played without a break, building intensity until the mesmerizing finale. Louis Lortie brings his “faultless pianistic sheen and mastery” (Gramophone) to this pinnacle of Schubert’s art.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

Bruch and Brahms

 

October 24 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 25 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

October 26 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Nathalie Stutzmann Conductor

David Kim Violin

 

Mendelssohn                            Hebrides Overture

Bruch                                       Violin Concerto No. 1

Brahms                                    Symphony No. 2

 

Max Bruch may have struggled to write it, but Concertmaster David Kim calls this violin concerto “the perfect combination of beautiful melodies and themes, virtuosic yet accessible.” Brahms’s Second Symphony, possibly his most popular, is said to be his personal favorite as well. Its pastoral aura surely accounts for some of its appeal; but Brahms being Brahms, there is tension and drama as well, building to an extraordinary, triumphant finale. Conductor Nathalie Stutzmann returns to demonstrate her superb chemistry with The Philadelphia Orchestra.

 

 Halloween Spooktacular

Family Concert

 

October 26 at 11:30 AM—Saturday morning—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Aram Demirjian Conductor

 

Put on your best Halloween costume and the Orchestra will put on theirs! We’ve got plenty of musical treats to fill up your goodie bag. The Philadelphia Orchestra explores the spooky and the silly in this orchestral adventure, an annual audience favorite!

 

 

The Phantom of the Opera

 

October 31 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

Peter Richard Conte Organ

 

The Phantom of the Opera (silent film with organ accompaniment)

 

The 1925 version of The Phantom of the Opera is technically a silent movie … but not when the mighty Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ is unleashed! Verizon Hall’s magnificent instrument creates the perfect soundtrack for this Hollywood classic, a tale of doomed love in the spooky confines of the Paris Opera House. Known for his performances on the legendary Wanamaker Organ, Peter Richard Conte is master of the keyboard for this special Halloween presentation.

Please note: The Philadelphia Orchestra does not perform on this concert.

 

This concert is part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 The Firebird

 

November 21 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

November 22 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

November 23 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Stéphane Denève Conductor

Kelley O’Connor Mezzo-soprano

 

Auerbach                                  Icarus for OrchestraFirst                Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Lieberson                                 Neruda SongsFirst Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Stravinsky                                The Firebird (complete ballet)

 

With these concerts our esteemed colleague Stéphane Denève begins his sixth and final season as our principal guest conductor. Soviet-born American composer Lera Auerbach says she was drawn to the myth of Icarus because of “his wish to reach the unreachable, the intensity of the ecstatic brevity of his flight, and the inevitability of his fall.” Her adventurous musical palette exploits the full sonic range of the orchestra: shimmering, soaring, and ultimately dying away. Stravinsky describes a different myth about feathered flight in his Firebird. He mined everything from Russian folk music to his classical forebears (especially his teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov) to tell this story of a prince, an evil king, and, of course, a magical firebird. Peter Lieberson set five love poems by Pablo Neruda to music in this touching work written for his wife, mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, who gave the world premiere.

 

 

L’Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal

 

November 24 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

L’Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor and Piano

Joyce DiDonato Mezzo-soprano

 

Mozart                                      “Ch’io mi scordi di te? ... Non temer, amato bene”

Mozart                                      “Parto, ma tu ben mio,” from La clemenza di Tito

Bruckner                                  Symphony No. 4 (“Romantic”)

 

Yannick has been artistic director and principal conductor of the Orchestre Métropolitain in his hometown of Montreal since 2000. Hear him conduct the ensemble for the first time in Philadelphia, leading a masterpiece by his beloved Bruckner. The radiant Joyce DiDonato joins for two ethereal arias by Mozart.

 

 BeethovenNOW: The Violin Concerto

 

November 29 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

November 30 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Susanna Mälkki Conductor

Gil Shaham Violin

 

Jolas                                        A Little Summer SuiteFirst              Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Beethoven                                Violin Concerto

Prokofiev                                  Symphony No. 5

 

Beethoven’s only violin concerto is “an amazing trip,” says Gil Shaham, from the opening drumbeats, through some of “the most sublime, most beautiful violin passages ever,” to the “perfect fiddling” of the final dance. Susanna Mälkki, renowned interpreter of new music, leads Betsy Jolas’s A Little Summer Suite, written in 2015 on the eve of the composer’s 90th birthday. The deceptively simple opening of Prokofiev’s rhapsodic Fifth Symphony gives way to a rich and complex display of his expansive talents, conceived, in the composer’s words, as “a symphony of the greatness of the human spirit.”

 

 

Organ and Brass Christmas

 

December 1 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

Musicians of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Brass Section

Peter Richard Conte Organ

 

Hark the herald trumpets (and horns, trombones, and tuba) sing! The unmatched sound and musicality of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s legendary brass section usher in the holiday season on a high note. And the glory of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ adds another heavenly voice to this collection of treasured Christmas music, with master organist Peter Richard Conte at the keyboard for this festive presentation.

 

Please note: The Philadelphia Orchestra does not perform on this concert.

 

This concert is part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 Bach’s Mass in B minor

 

December 5 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 6 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 7 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Westminster Symphonic Choir

     Joe Miller Director

 

Bach                                        Mass in B minor

 

This work of towering musicality and deep spirituality is a fitting summation of J.S. Bach’s epochal career; he finished it the year before he died. It’s “above and beyond every piece of music that’s been created for liturgical purposes,” says Yannick Nézet-Séguin. A setting of the complete Latin Mass, it demands superlatives, at the same time rendering them inadequate. Yannick’s mastery of vocal music, the Westminster Symphonic Choir, distinguished vocal soloists, and the inimitable Philadelphia Orchestra will bring the Mass to life as a peak musical and spiritual experience for every listener.

 

This concert is part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 

Wynton Marsalis’s Blues Symphony

 

December 12 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 13 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 14 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Cristian Măcelaru Conductor

Leonidas Kavakos Violin

 

Shostakovich                            Violin Concerto No. 1

Marsalis                                   Blues SymphonyFirst                     Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

 

Pulitzer Prize-winner Wynton Marsalis switches from jazz band to symphony orchestra for his Blues Symphony. “Blues is affirmation with absolute elegance,” says Marsalis, and he uses the classic 12-bar musical form as the basis for this work, which celebrates all types of American and African-American music, from spirituals to ragtime, from marches to bluegrass. This Philadelphia premiere is conducted by our long-time friend Cristian Măcelaru. Shostakovich’s emotional First Violin Concerto reveals the pure power and technical prowess of orchestra and soloist. Leonidas Kavakos, “a marvel of exactitude” (The Philadelphia Inquirer), describes the dialogues between the two as “absolutely breathtaking.”

 

Christmas Kids’ Spectacular

Family Concert

 

December 14 at 11:30 AM—Saturday morning—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Aram Demirjian Conductor

 

It’s the start of the holiday season! Join us for a festive celebration of all your favorite Christmas sounds and sing-alongs. Listen closely for those jingle bells, too—you never know who might pay a special visit to Verizon Hall.

 

 

The Glorious Sound of Christmas

 

December 19 at 7:00 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 20 at 7:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

December 21 at 7:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Bramwell Tovey Conductor

 

The Glorious Sound of Christmas has been a Philadelphia Orchestra tradition since the Philadelphians and Eugene Ormandy released the now-iconic recording in 1962. Make these concerts part of your holiday tradition with these jubilant and family-friendly concerts.

 

 

Messiah

 

December 22 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Jane Glover Conductor

Philadelphia Symphonic Choir

     Joe Miller Director

 

Handel                                      Messiah

 

Shortly after sending Handel his libretto for a new oratorio, Charles Jennens wrote to a friend, hoping that the composer “will lay out his whole genius and skill upon it.” In 24 days of feverish writing, Handel did just that, creating his immortal Messiah. Pioneering conductor and Handel expert Jane Glover brings her decades of experience with opera and Baroque music back to the Kimmel Center for our holiday presentation of this masterwork, with the Philadelphia Symphonic Choir joining the Orchestra for a revelatory performance.

 

This concert is part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 New Year’s Eve

 

December 31 at 7:30 PM—Tuesday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Bramwell Tovey Conductor

 

The popular Bramwell Tovey returns, bringing his inimitable flair and irrepressible joy to our New Year’s Eve concert. Bring on the bubbly and ring in 2020 with the Fabulous Philadelphians.

 

 

Disney’s Fantasia—Live in Concert

 

January 3 at 7:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

January 4 at 7:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

January 5 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

 

Fantasia is a pinnacle of cinematic art, and a landmark in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s incredible tradition of innovation. This groundbreaking 1940 collaboration between the visionary genius Walt Disney and the Orchestra’s commanding maestro Leopold Stokowski has never lost its capacity to move, delight, and astonish audiences all over the world. There is simply nothing like a live performance of this classic by your Philadelphia Orchestra.

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts ©. All rights reserved.

 

 

Free Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert

 

January 20 at 7:00 PM—Monday evening

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Join The Philadelphia Orchestra for its annual Martin Luther King, Jr., Tribute Concert, honoring the life and work of the great Dr. King and celebrating our Philadelphia community through the uniting power of music.

 

 BeethovenNOW: Bronfman Plays Concerto No. 4

 

January 23 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Academy of Music

January 24 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Academy of Music

January 26 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Academy of Music

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Yefim Bronfman Piano

 

Fung                                        Dust DevilsFirst Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Beethoven                                Piano Concerto No. 4

Rachmaninoff                           Symphony No. 3

 

The Orchestra returns to the Academy of Music for its first subscription concerts since moving to Verizon Hall in 2001. It’s a fitting venue for Rachmaninoff’s nostalgic, romantic Symphony No. 3, premiered by the composer’s cherished Philadelphians in 1936 on that very same stage, with Leopold Stokowski conducting. The gentle, lone piano chords that open the Fourth Concerto were a radical construct when Beethoven premiered the wide-ranging and emotional work in 1808. Yefim Bronfman says he’s always been drawn to its tenderness.

 

 

Academy of Music 163rd Anniversary Concert

 

January 25 at 7:00 PM—Saturday evening—Academy of Music

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Join The Philadelphia Orchestra in celebrating the 163rd birthday of the Academy of Music—the Orchestra’s original home and the place where the famous Philadelphia Sound was created. How amazing, says Yannick, that after all these years, “the Grand Old Lady of Locust Street is not a museum, but a muse,” still inspiring the most beautiful music. The annual Anniversary Concert and Ball is the premier musical and social event on Philadelphia’s calendar, a star-studded gala featuring an array of the world’s best artists, performing beneath the Academy’s glittering chandelier. Recent guest artists have included Sting, Steve Martin, Al Pacino, Hugh Jackman, and Helen Mirren.

Save the date and join the invitation list by calling the Academy of Music Restoration Fund Office at 215.893.1978 or visiting theacademyball.org.

Proceeds from the Anniversary Concert and Ball benefit the ongoing preservation and restoration of the Academy of Music, an important National Historic Landmark Building, and The Philadelphia Orchestra.

 

 BeethovenNOW: Trifonov Plays Concertos No. 1 and 5

 

January 30 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

January 31 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 1 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 2 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Daniil Trifonov Piano

 

Boulanger                                 Of a Sad EveningFirst                    Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Beethoven                                Piano Concerto No. 1 (Thursday and Friday)

Beethoven                                Piano Concerto No. 5 (“Emperor”) (Saturday and Sunday)

Farrenc                                    Symphony No. 2—First                      Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

 

Daniil Trifonov, the Orchestra’s Grammy-winning recording partner, returns for four performances. Amplifying the programs are two underappreciated works by formidable women composers: Lili Boulanger, the first woman to win, in 1913, the prestigious Prix de Rome composition prize, and Louise Farrenc, whose Symphony No. 2 dialogues with Beethoven, and leaves us asking why her works are not a more integral part of the canon today.

 

 

BeethovenNOW: Ax Plays Concertos No. 2 and 3

 

February 6 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 7 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 8 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Karina Canellakis Conductor—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Emanuel Ax Piano

 

Di Castri                                   LineageFirst Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Beethoven                                Piano Concerto No. 2 (Thursday and Saturday)

Beethoven                                Piano Concerto No. 3 (Friday)

Lutosłlawski                              Concerto for Orchestra

 

Beethoven composed “the most positive music ever written,” with every work containing “every emotion known to man,” says Emanuel Ax, who completes our piano concerto cycle. Beethoven made his public debut with his Second Concerto, a dramatic, humorous, ebullient work that announced the young artist’s arrival. The muscular Third embodies Beethoven’s “proud Prospero-like assertion of his beloved C-minor powers.” (Gramophone) Rising star and Curtis Institute of Music graduate Karina Canellakis makes her Philadelphia Orchestra debut, also leading Canadian composer Zosha Di Castri’s 2015 tribute to her grandmother and Lutosławski’s fascinating showpiece for orchestra.

 

 Sorcerers, Spells, and Magic

 

February 13 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 14 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 15 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Stéphane Denève Conductor

Westminster Symphonic Choir

     Joe Miller Director

Philadelphia Boys Choir

     Jeffrey R. Smith Artistic Director

 

Mozart                                      Overture to The Magic Flute

Dukas                                      The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

Williams                                   Selections from Harry Potter

Ravel                                       L’Enfant et les sortilèges

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates Valentine’s weekend with spellbinding music, beginning with Mozart’s bewitching The Magic Flute. Magic takes a darker turn in The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, Dukas’s symphonic poem immortalized by Mickey Mouse battling demonic brooms in Fantasia. Stéphane Denève is a passionate exponent of John Williams’s endlessly creative music for the cinema, represented here by his spookily charming Harry Potter scores. Youth and magic reappear in Ravel’s L’Enfant et les sortilèges (The Child and the Magic Spells), a one-act fairy tale opera with libretto by renowned French author Colette, and featuring talent from the Metropolitan Opera’s Lindemann Young Artist Development Program. Enchanting!

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

Symphonie fantastique

 

February 20 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 21 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 22 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Herbert Blomstedt Conductor

Lise de la Salle Piano

 

Mendelssohn                            Piano Concerto No. 2

Berlioz                                      Symphonie fantastique

 

Mendelssohn wrote his Second Piano Concerto right after he got married and there’s plenty of joy expressed, especially in the final movement, which the composer himself described as “piano fireworks.” He was the soloist at the premiere in 1837. The young French pianist Lise de la Salle (“For much of the concert, the audience had to remember to breathe…” –The Washington Post) is a riveting choice to interpret this concerto. Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique is a tour de force of compositional color, a breakthrough that set the stage for his most assured writing. While said to depict the opium-inspired visions of a lovesick young artist, the music needs no libretto to communicate its passion. Who better to lead this celebration of youthful intensity than the ageless Herbert Blomstedt!

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

Respighi’s Pines of Rome

 

February 27 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 28 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

February 29 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Donald Runnicles Conductor

Paul Jacobs Organ

 

Elgar                                        In the South

Daugherty                                Once Upon a Castle, for organ and orchestra—First                                                 Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Elgar                                        Introduction and Allegro

Respighi                                   Pines of Rome

 

Two journeys to Italy bookend this program. Respighi’s Pines of Rome is a sweeping pictorial of the Italian landscape. Edward Elgar’s scintillating tone poem In the South commemorates a family holiday; the richly textured music conveys the Italian Riviera in all its warmth. Elgar’s Introduction and Allegro is a showcase for strings. Inspired by the theater organ in William Randolph Hearst’s San Simeon (fictionalized as Xanadu in Citizen Kane), Michael Daugherty’s lush Once Upon a Castle brings out what the composer calls the “Technicolor” nature of the instrument. The esteemed Scottish maestro Donald Runnicles conducts; keyboard virtuoso Paul Jacobs returns to the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.

 

These concerts are part of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience.

 

 

Porgy and Bess

 

March 5 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 6 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 7 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Marin Alsop Conductor

Angel Blue Soprano—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Lester Lynch Baritone—Philadelphia Orchestra Subscription Debut

 

Gershwin                                  Highlights from Porgy and Bess

 

This American classic is the story of a man trying to rescue a woman from her distressing life. To help create his masterpiece, George Gershwin immersed himself in African-American life and culture on Charleston’s Catfish Row, honoring the area’s folk traditions with timeless melodies. Pioneering conductor Marin Alsop leads our performances of this tale of oppression, struggle, hope, and love. The cast includes soprano Angel Blue (hailed by Plácido Domingo as “the next Leontyne Price”) and celebrated baritone Lester Lynch.

 

 Carnival of the Animals

Family Concert

 

March 7 at 11:30 AM—Saturday morning—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Dancers from the Rock School for Dance Education

     Bojan Spassoff Director

 

Saint-Saëns                              Carnival of the Animals

 

Lions and tigers and ... pianists? Oh, my! Camille Saint-Saëns’s Carnival of the Animals is a musical journey through the animal kingdom that’s fun for all ages. Verizon Hall will be magically turned into a zoo through your child’s imagination as animals are conjured up by the musicians of the Orchestra

 

 

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 5 and 6

 

March 12 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 13 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Carnegie Hall

March 14 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 15 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Habibi                                       Work in Dialogue with Beethoven—World Premiere—Philadelphia                             Orchestra Commission

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 5

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”)

 

The indelible four-note opening of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony lays the foundation for a truly fateful symphonic journey. Written in 1804, and on the program when The Philadelphia Orchestra gave its first concert in 1900, it’s an epic tour de force that resonates in 2020. Following its rousing conclusion come the verdant valleys and sweet smells of the woods and the Austrian countryside, an exposition of Beethoven’s love of nature. Composed and premiered at the same time, the “Pastoral” offers a striking contrast to the assertive Fifth.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 2 and 3

 

March 19 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 20 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Carnegie Hall

March 21 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 22 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Hunt                                         Work in Dialogue with Beethoven—World Premiere—Philadelphia                             Orchestra Commission

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 2

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 3 (“Eroica”)

 

Beethoven was just beginning to go deaf when he wrote his Second Symphony and though he was losing his hearing, he was finding his voice. He could have composed a manifestation of despair, but instead gave the world one of his most ebullient and life-affirming works. The Third Symphony was groundbreaking, a turning point in the composer’s oeuvre and a watershed in musical history. A vast ode to heroism, revolution, and freedom, the “Eroica” is considered by many to be the greatest not just of Beethoven’s symphonies, but of all time.

 

 

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 8, 4, and 7

 

March 26 at 8:00 PM—Thursday evening—Carnegie Hall

March 27 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 28 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

March 29 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Simon                                       Work in Dialogue with Beethoven—World Premiere—Philadelphia                             Orchestra Commission

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 8

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 4

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 7

 

Buoyant and humorous, the Eighth Symphony belies none of the composer’s worsening health issues or what had to be the devastating end of a love affair, detailed in a famous letter written around the same time to his “Immortal Beloved.” Perhaps the least known, the Fourth was widely admired: Schumann compared it to “a slender Greek maiden” between the two “Norse giants” of the Third and Fifth; Berlioz insisted it was the work of an angel. And Tchaikovsky described the triumphant Seventh as “full of unrestrained joy, full of bliss and pleasure of life.” The exhilarating and familiar second movement is said to have been so inspiring at the premiere, an encore was demanded instantly.

 

 BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 1 and 9

 

April 2 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

April 3 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Carnegie Hall

April 4 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

April 5 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Angel Blue Soprano

Mihoko Fujimura Mezzo-soprano

Rolando Villazón Tenor

Quinn Kelsey Baritone—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Westminster Symphonic Choir and Community Voices

     Joe Miller Director

 

Frank                                       Work in Dialogue with Beethoven—World Premiere—Philadelphia                             Orchestra Commission

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 1

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 9 (“Choral”)

 

Beethoven was just 25 when he wrote his First Symphony. Delightful and high-spirited, floating on strains of Mozart and Haydn, it’s a fascinating glimpse of the greatness and genius to come—all on full, glorious display in the climactic Ninth. Written just a few short years before his death, Beethoven’s profound ode to brotherhood, salvation, and pure joy reminds us why we are here as an orchestra, says Yannick, and why we constantly try to make our world better by playing music.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

Washington Performing Arts

 

April 15 at 8:00 PM—Wednesday evening—John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Stéphane Denève Conductor

Kelley O’Connor Mezzo-soprano

 

Clyne                                       This Midnight HourFirst Philadelphia Orchestra Performance

Lieberson                                 Neruda Songs

Prokofiev                                  Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet

 

 Thibaudet and Liszt

 

April 17 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

April 18 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Stéphane Denève Conductor

Jean-Yves Thibaudet Piano

 

Clyne                                       This Midnight Hour

Liszt                                         Piano Concerto No. 2

Strauss                                    Ein Heldenleben

 

Stéphane Denève’s final subscription concerts as the Orchestra’s principal guest conductor culminate with Strauss’s epic Ein Heldenleben—literally, A Hero’s Life—an extravagant, all-encompassing, semi-autobiographical tone poem that quotes from his own prodigious masterpieces. Anna Clyne’s imaginative This Midnight Hour, highlighting the power of the lower strings, evokes the journey of a mysterious woman “stripped bare, running mad through the night.” Liszt’s heady Second Piano Concerto is gorgeous and technically challenging. Jean-Yves Thibaudet brings to it his intense power and quintessential flair.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony

 

April 23 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

April 24 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

April 25 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla Conductor

Jeffrey Khaner Flute

 

Šerkšnytė                                 De ProfundisFirst Philadelphia Orchestra Performances

Nielsen                                     Flute Concerto

Tchaikovsky                             Symphony No. 4

 

After a compelling debut in 2018, the young conductor Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla returns to the podium with De Profundis, written by her Lithuanian countrywoman Raminta Šerkšnytė. This surging, brooding work exploits the richness and color of the Orchestra’s strings to the fullest. Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner is especially pleased to be performing the Nielsen Concerto. “I love the back and forth in the orchestration; it’s a lot of fun to play and listen to!” Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony was written at a time of intense personal turmoil. He poured all his passion into the work, at times letting traditional symphonic structure take a back seat to his matchless gift for melody. From the fateful opening fanfare to the explosive, folkloric finale, the Fourth is a sonic spectacular.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

 

April 30 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 1 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 2 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Tugan Sokhiev Conductor

Lukas Geniušas Piano—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

 

Firsova                                     The Garden of Dreams: Hommage to ShostakovichFirst Philadelphia                             Orchestra Performances

Tchaikovsky                             Piano Concerto No. 2

Shostakovich                            Symphony No. 5

 

Tchaikovsky’s Second Piano Concerto may be overshadowed by his more famous First, but it’s the piece that earned Lukas Geniušas top honors at the Tchaikovsky Competition. Balanchine, too, recognized its consummate beauty, choosing it as the score for his tribute to classical Russian ballet. The government decided what was art when Shostakovich wrote his vehement and complicated Fifth Symphony under an oppressive Soviet regime (and threat of the Gulag). Elena Firsova—blacklisted and exiled from the Soviet Union in the latter part of the 20th century—pays tribute to her compatriot with The Garden of Dreams. Tugan Sokhiev, music director of the Bolshoi Theatre, leads this incisive program.

 

These concerts will be LiveNote® enabled.

 

 

The Life and Times of Beethoven

Family Concert

 

May 2 at 11:30 AM—Saturday morning—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Michael Boudewyns Actor

 

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 5

 

Professor Nigel Taproot, the affable and learned classical music aficionado, invites you to an original Really Inventive Stuff program for families celebrating Beethoven’s 250th birthday, his remarkable age, and four famous notes. Featuring the music of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, with a playful peppering of fascinating facts and timely trivia. (Did you know Washington was president during Beethoven’s lifetime? Roller skates were invented, too!) This enlightening performance is a splendid introduction to Beethoven’s musical genius.

 

 An American in Paris

 

May 7 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 8 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 9 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Ludovic Morlot Conductor—Philadelphia Orchestra Subscription Debut

 

Gershwin                                  An American in Paris (complete with film)

 

George Gershwin’s Jazz Age tone poem An American in Paris both inspired the now-classic Hollywood movie and provides the score for its groundbreaking finale: a dreamy—and, at 17 minutes, unheard of—ballet sequence starring Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron. The 1951 film, directed by Vincente Minnelli, swept the Academy Awards, winning six Oscars, including Best Picture. The music also features George and Ira Gershwin standards like “I Got Rhythm,” “’S Wonderful,” and “Love Is Here to Stay.” See the film in its entirety with the lush sound of The Philadelphia Orchestra performing the score live.

 

 

BeethovenNOW: Solo Piano Recital with Evgeny Kissin

 

May 14 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

Evgeny Kissin Piano

 

Beethoven                                Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 (“Pathétique”)

Beethoven                                Fifteen Variations and a Fugue on an Original Theme in E-flat major,

                                                Op. 35 (“Eroica”)

Beethoven                                Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2

Beethoven                                Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”)

 

In a season presenting all nine of Beethoven’s symphonies, and all five of his piano concertos, we can’t ignore his solo piano pieces, some of the most unforgettable music ever written. From the “Pathétique” with its echoes of Mozart to the “Eroica” Variations, using thematic material from his Third Symphony, to the innovative D-minor and the heroic and technically challenging “Waldstein,” this brief survey underscores yet again Beethoven’s monumental musical genius. The internationally acclaimed virtuoso Evgeny Kissin performs these masterpieces.

Please note: The Philadelphia Orchestra does not perform on this concert.

A co-presentation by the Kimmel Center and The Philadelphia Orchestra.

 

 Elektra

 

May 15 at 8:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 17 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 19 at 7:30 PM—Tuesday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Christine Goerke Soprano (Elektra)—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Amber Wagner Soprano (Chrysothemis)—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Michaela Martens Mezzo-soprano (Klytämnestra)—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Mikhail Petrenko Bass (Orest)

Jay Hunter Morris Tenor (Aegisth)—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

Philadelphia Symphonic Choir

     Joe Miller Director

Jonathan Loy Stage Director—Philadelphia Orchestra Debut

 

Strauss                                    Elektra

 

The reviews were rapturous for Yannick’s “blazing and urgent, yet richly nuanced account of Strauss’s still-shocking score” (The New York Times) when he led Elektra at the Metropolitan Opera in 2018. He reprises the triumph with these symphonically staged performances starring The Philadelphia Orchestra and a cast of vocal powerhouses. Christine Goerke sings the title role, a tormented daughter obsessed with avenging the death of her father, Agamemnon. Mikhail Petrenko portrays the brother she hopes will kill the murderous culprits: their mother and her lover. This is a hair-raising, harrowing 100 minutes of electrifying music, heard in full, vivid detail with the Orchestra on stage.

 

 

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 5 and 6

 

May 16 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

 

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 5

Beethoven                                Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”)

 

Yannick reprises a highlight of our season’s Beethoven celebration for a special, one-night-only performance of two masterpieces. The indelible four-note opening of the Fifth Symphony lays the foundation for a truly fateful symphonic journey. Written in 1804, and on the program when The Philadelphia Orchestra gave its first concert in 1900, it’s an epic tour de force that resonates in 2020. Following its rousing conclusion come the verdant valleys and sweet smells of the woods and the Austrian countryside, an exposition of Beethoven’s love of nature. Composed and premiered at the same time, the “Pastoral” offers a striking contrast to the assertive Fifth.

 

 Yuja Wang and the Brahms Piano Concertos

 

May 28 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 29 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 30 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

May 31 at 2:00 PM—Sunday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Yuja Wang Piano

 

Brahms                                    Piano Concerto No. 1 (Thursday and Friday)

Brahms                                    Piano Concerto No. 2 (Saturday and Sunday)

Sibelius                                    Symphony No. 3

 

Brahms wrote just two piano concertos. He was 25 when he completed his youthful and vigorous First Concerto. Two decades later he composed his tremendous Second; Yannick compares the final, fourth movement to playing in heaven, surrounded by angels. The fiery Yuja Wang, Curtis Institute of Music graduate and Philadelphia favorite, returns to her second home for four performances, bringing her technical virtuosity and thoughtful depth of music-making to these two corresponding and harmonious works. Hear them both, paired with Sibelius’s Symphony No. 3, a masterpiece of the Finnish national hero.

 

 

The Season Finale

 

June 4 at 7:30 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

June 5 at 2:00 PM—Friday afternoon—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

June 6 at 8:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Conductor

Philadelphia Symphonic Choir

     Joe Miller Director

 

Bruckner                                  Selected Motets

Bruckner                                  Symphony No. 3 (original version)

 

Bruckner is “one of the great symphonists of all time,” says Yannick. His music is “spiritual, romantic, dreamy, imposing, cataclysmic … music that excites all the emotions and magnifies the results of the symphony.” A Bruckner champion and world-renowned interpreter, Yannick’s deep affinity for the composer shines in passionate performances of the thrilling Third Symphony, “an unquestioned masterpiece, a citadel that no critic can pull down. Bruckner’s invention is exuberant throughout: the finale confidently transforms the tragic mood of the first movement into triumph.” (The New Yorker) A set of exquisite Bruckner motets, sung a cappella, provides a contemplative opening to a program that aims to end the season’s musical journey in communion with the divine.

 

 Up—Live in Concert

 

June 11 at 7:00 PM—Thursday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

June 12 at 7:00 PM—Friday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

June 13 at 7:00 PM—Saturday evening—Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

 

The Philadelphia Orchestra

 

Giacchino                                 Up (complete with film)

 

A 78-year-old curmudgeonly balloon salesman is not your average hero. When he ties thousands of balloons to his house and flies away to the wilds of South America, he finally fulfills his lifelong dream of adventure. But after Carl discovers an eight-year-old stowaway named Russell, this unlikely duo soon finds themselves on a hilarious journey in a lost world filled with danger and surprises. This film is enhanced by Michael Giacchino’s Academy Award-winning original score performed live by the incomparable Philadelphia Orchestra.

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts ©. All rights reserved.

 

 

LiveNote is funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the William Penn Foundation.

 

The Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ Experience (Frederick R. Haas, Artistic Advisor) is supported through a generous grant from the Wyncote Foundation.

 

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