Hidden from small


Hidden from small

Playbill

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December 02, 2015

Mei Ching Huang - Behind the Scenes

Each month in the Orchestra’s Playbill, we feature one musician in a question-and-answer segment. Below is that feature in its entirety.

Where were you born? In Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

What piece of music could you play over and over again? Stephen Foster’s “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair,” arranged by Jascha Heifetz.

November 02, 2015

Susie Robinson - In the Spotlight

A Monthly Profile of Orchestra Fans and Family

Susie Robinson’s husband, Norman, always said his wife never knew when to quit. And that’s been a very good thing for The Philadelphia Orchestra, which recently honored her with the Golden Baton Award for her 50 years of dedicated volunteer service and leadership.

November 02, 2015

For Love of Nation - This Season The Philadelphia Orchestra Explores National Pride

The explosion of nationalism in the mid-19th century fostered a love of one’s region and the history and traditions of the civilizations that emerged there, as well as a sense of self-determination—of taking that history and tradition in hand to build something greater. And its artistic yield was considerable: Artists in all disciplines, and musicians particularly, worked hard to identify the distinct ways their people perceived the world.

November 02, 2015

Jeffrey Curnow - Behind the Scenes

Each month in the Orchestra’s Playbill, we feature one musician in a question-and-answer segment. Below is that feature in its entirety.

Where were you born? In Wilmington, Delaware.

What piece of music could you play over and over again? Well, see, that’s the problem. I’m playing these pieces over and over again.

September 29, 2015

Barbara Govatos - Behind the Scenes

Each month in the Orchestra’s Playbill, we feature one musician in a question-and-answer segment. Below is that feature in its entirety.

Where were you born? In Wilmington, Delaware.

What piece of music could you play over and over again? Strauss’s Don Juan and Bartók’s Divertimento for strings.

September 29, 2015

The Keeper of the Sound - As He Begins his Fourth Season as Music Director, Yannick Talks about the Philadelphia Sound

It’s a concept that’s so familiar to fans of The Philadelphia Orchestra it seems to need no explanation: the Philadelphia Sound. Born under the legendary Leopold Stokowski, burnished under the equally legendary Eugene Ormandy, the Sound has been part of the orchestral landscape for generations, acknowledged and enjoyed in Philadelphia and in concert halls literally around the globe.

Photo by Jessica Griffin

April 02, 2015

Let’s Go Hear a Movie

If you’re reading this article, there’s a good chance you’re settled into a comfortable seat in Verizon Hall about to enjoy a superb live orchestral concert by the fabulous Philadelphia Orchestra! While we may think of orchestral music only in terms of live performances in acoustically tuned halls, the sound of orchestral instruments is perhaps more ubiquitous outside the concert hall than we realize. Audiences worldwide hear symphonic music every day: And they’re not even sitting in a concert hall!

March 31, 2015

Osagie Imasogie - In the Spotlight

A Monthly Profile of Orchestra Fans and Family

There’s one thing Osagie Imasogie thinks everyone should know about The Philadelphia Orchestra:

March 31, 2015

Choong-Jin Chang - Behind the Scenes

Each month in the Orchestra’s Playbill, we feature one musician in a question-and-answer segment. Below is that feature in its entirety.

Where were you born? In Seoul, Korea.

What piece of music could you play over and over again? Anything by J.S. Bach.

March 05, 2015

A Kaleidoscopic Mix of Music, Dance, and Theater - The Philadelphia Orchestra Prepares for Bernstein’s MASS

Musical works, like the composers who create them, often take on lives of their own, rising and falling in popularity, with works scorned by one generation being celebrated by the next—and vice versa. The vicissitudes of taste, and the social and historical circumstances that influence it, over long stretches of time, make predicating a musical work’s ultimate stature a fool’s game, but it was not for nothing that Gustav Mahler famously predicted, “my time will come.”

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