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8:00 PM

All Mozart

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Jane Glover - Conductor
Daniel Matsukawa - Bassoon
Mozart - Symphony No. 1
Mozart - Bassoon Concerto
INTERMISSION
Mozart - Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter")

There’s no denying Mozart was a genius in the most literal sense of the word. Here’s an opportunity to experience the full sweep of his astonishing talent, from his first symphony, composed when he was just eight years old, to his last, the complex and majestic “Jupiter.” In between he produced a staggering body of work, including his first woodwind concerto, composed at age 18. “We are honored as bassoonists that he chose us first among all the woodwind instruments. It’s a masterwork. And it’s written for us and such a fantastic privilege!” says Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa, comparing his role in these concerts to “the lucky tenor or soprano who gets to sing the arias” in the midst of two great symphonic works. The esteemed British conductor and Mozart specialist Jane Glover makes her subscription debut in this effervescent program.

 
2:00 PM

All Mozart

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Jane Glover - Conductor
Daniel Matsukawa - Bassoon
Mozart - Symphony No. 1
Mozart - Bassoon Concerto
INTERMISSION
Mozart - Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter")

There’s no denying Mozart was a genius in the most literal sense of the word. Here’s an opportunity to experience the full sweep of his astonishing talent, from his first symphony, composed when he was just eight years old, to his last, the complex and majestic “Jupiter.” In between he produced a staggering body of work, including his first woodwind concerto, composed at age 18. “We are honored as bassoonists that he chose us first among all the woodwind instruments. It’s a masterwork. And it’s written for us and such a fantastic privilege!” says Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa, comparing his role in these concerts to “the lucky tenor or soprano who gets to sing the arias” in the midst of two great symphonic works. The esteemed British conductor and Mozart specialist Jane Glover makes her subscription debut in this effervescent program.

 
10:00 AM

Sound All Around Winds

10:00 AM, Academy Of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Hugh Sung - Piano
Elizabeth Starr Masoudnia - English horn

Take a deep breath and get ready to learn all about flutes and reeds! The woodwind family which got its name from instruments originally made of wood, includes the flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. Though usually not part of an orchestra, this family also includes the saxophone. So how do these instruments work? Flutes produce sound when the air blown into the instrument vibrates, while the vibration of the reed produces sound for reed instruments. Elizabeth Masoudnia, the featured musician in this program, plays the English horn.

 
11:15 AM

Sound All Around Winds

11:15 AM, Academy Of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Hugh Sung - Piano
Elizabeth Starr Masoudnia - English horn

Take a deep breath and get ready to learn all about flutes and reeds! The woodwind family which got its name from instruments originally made of wood, includes the flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. Though usually not part of an orchestra, this family also includes the saxophone. So how do these instruments work? Flutes produce sound when the air blown into the instrument vibrates, while the vibration of the reed produces sound for reed instruments. Elizabeth Masoudnia, the featured musician in this program, plays the English horn.
 
8:00 PM

All Mozart

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Jane Glover - Conductor
Daniel Matsukawa - Bassoon
Mozart - Symphony No. 1
Mozart - Bassoon Concerto
INTERMISSION
Mozart - Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter")

There’s no denying Mozart was a genius in the most literal sense of the word. Here’s an opportunity to experience the full sweep of his astonishing talent, from his first symphony, composed when he was just eight years old, to his last, the complex and majestic “Jupiter.” In between he produced a staggering body of work, including his first woodwind concerto, composed at age 18. “We are honored as bassoonists that he chose us first among all the woodwind instruments. It’s a masterwork. And it’s written for us and such a fantastic privilege!” says Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa, comparing his role in these concerts to “the lucky tenor or soprano who gets to sing the arias” in the midst of two great symphonic works. The esteemed British conductor and Mozart specialist Jane Glover makes her subscription debut in this effervescent program.

 
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10:00 AM

Sound All Around Winds

10:00 AM, Academy Of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Hugh Sung - Piano
Elizabeth Starr Masoudnia - English horn

Take a deep breath and get ready to learn all about flutes and reeds! The woodwind family which got its name from instruments originally made of wood, includes the flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. Though usually not part of an orchestra, this family also includes the saxophone. So how do these instruments work? Flutes produce sound when the air blown into the instrument vibrates, while the vibration of the reed produces sound for reed instruments. Elizabeth Masoudnia, the featured musician in this program, plays the English horn.
 
11:15 AM

Sound All Around Winds

11:15 AM, Academy Of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Hugh Sung - Piano
Elizabeth Starr Masoudnia - English horn

Take a deep breath and get ready to learn all about flutes and reeds! The woodwind family which got its name from instruments originally made of wood, includes the flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. Though usually not part of an orchestra, this family also includes the saxophone. So how do these instruments work? Flutes produce sound when the air blown into the instrument vibrates, while the vibration of the reed produces sound for reed instruments. Elizabeth Masoudnia, the featured musician in this program, plays the English horn.
 
 
 
8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Opening Week

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Susan Graham - Mezzo-soprano
Chabrier - Joyeuse Marche
Fauré - Pavane
Saint-Saëns - "Bacchanale," from Samson and Delilah
Canteloube - Selections from Songs of the Auvergne
INTERMISSION
Ravel - Menuet antique
Schmitt - Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé

Paris is home to one of the world’s richest mixtures of culture and music. This first of three Festival programs celebrates composers who were based in the City of Light. At the heart of the concert are the gorgeous selections from Joseph Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne, a work often requested by our audience. Mezzo-soprano Susan Graham will float the exquisite melodies straight into your heart while showcasing the extraordinary chemistry she enjoys with Yannick. Chabrier was a composer’s composer; his Joyeuse Marche is a jaunty parade through the boulevards of Paris. Fauré’s haunting Pavane has delighted Parisiens (and everyone else) since its first performances in the 1880s. Saint-Saëns’s “Bacchanale” is a raucous episode from his opera Samson and Delilah. Ravel’s Menuet antique is perhaps inspired by Chabrier, an early supporter. And Florent Schmitt’s Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé anticipates the work of another Paris resident, Stravinsky. The lives (and works) of these composers intertwined; we know you’ll relish the musical riches that could only have been born in Paris.

 
8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Opening Week

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Susan Graham - Mezzo-soprano
Chabrier - Joyeuse Marche
Fauré - Pavane
Saint-Saëns - "Bacchanale," from Samson and Delilah
Canteloube - Selections from Songs of the Auvergne
INTERMISSION
Ravel - Menuet antique
Schmitt - Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé

Paris is home to one of the world’s richest mixtures of culture and music. This first of three Festival programs celebrates composers who were based in the City of Light. At the heart of the concert are the gorgeous selections from Joseph Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne, a work often requested by our audience. Mezzo-soprano Susan Graham will float the exquisite melodies straight into your heart while showcasing the extraordinary chemistry she enjoys with Yannick. Chabrier was a composer’s composer; his Joyeuse Marche is a jaunty parade through the boulevards of Paris. Fauré’s haunting Pavane has delighted Parisiens (and everyone else) since its first performances in the 1880s. Saint-Saëns’s “Bacchanale” is a raucous episode from his opera Samson and Delilah. Ravel’s Menuet antique is perhaps inspired by Chabrier, an early supporter. And Florent Schmitt’s Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé anticipates the work of another Paris resident, Stravinsky. The lives (and works) of these composers intertwined; we know you’ll relish the musical riches that could only have been born in Paris.

 
8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Opening Week

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Susan Graham - Mezzo-soprano
Chabrier - Joyeuse Marche
Fauré - Pavane
Saint-Saëns - "Bacchanale," from Samson and Delilah
Canteloube - Selections from Songs of the Auvergne
INTERMISSION
Ravel - Menuet antique
Schmitt - Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé

Paris is home to one of the world’s richest mixtures of culture and music. This first of three Festival programs celebrates composers who were based in the City of Light. At the heart of the concert are the gorgeous selections from Joseph Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne, a work often requested by our audience. Mezzo-soprano Susan Graham will float the exquisite melodies straight into your heart while showcasing the extraordinary chemistry she enjoys with Yannick. Chabrier was a composer’s composer; his Joyeuse Marche is a jaunty parade through the boulevards of Paris. Fauré’s haunting Pavane has delighted Parisiens (and everyone else) since its first performances in the 1880s. Saint-Saëns’s “Bacchanale” is a raucous episode from his opera Samson and Delilah. Ravel’s Menuet antique is perhaps inspired by Chabrier, an early supporter. And Florent Schmitt’s Suite from La Tragédie de Salomé anticipates the work of another Paris resident, Stravinsky. The lives (and works) of these composers intertwined; we know you’ll relish the musical riches that could only have been born in Paris.

 
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1:30 PM

MLK Tribute Concert

1:30 PM, Girard College Chapel
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Paul Jacobs - Organ
Xavier Foley - Double Bass
Charlotte Blake Alston - Speaker
Choirs from CAPA
Dorina Morrow - Director
Hailstork - Celebration!
Barber - Toccata festiva, for organ and orchestra
Rota - First movement from Divertimento concertante, for double bass and orchestra
Barber - Adagio for Strings
Bach - Selections from Magnificat
Smallwood - “Total Praise”
Johnson - “Lift Every Voice and Sing”

Join The Philadelphia Orchestra in honoring the life and work of the great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, and in celebrating our Philadelphia community, with the uniting power of music. The concert is free but tickets are required, and will be available beginning January 10, 2017, at 12 PM. Seating will be general admission and is first-come, first-served. Tickets do not guarantee entry and there is a limit of two per person. Doors will open at 1 PM.
Additionally, this year's performance will be broadcast live on WRTI 90.1 FM.

 
 
 
8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Week 2

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Louis Lortie - Piano
Chopin - Piano Concerto No. 1
INTERMISSION
Stravinsky - Petrushka

On our second visit to Paris, Yannick and the Orchestra feature two brilliant musical expats who made the French capital their home, while never forgetting their native land. Frédéric Chopin wrote his Piano Concerto No. 1 before he left Poland in 1830; political upheaval drove him to Paris, where he remained for the rest of his life, dazzling the city (and audiences and critics throughout the world) with his extraordinary performing and composing skills. The Concerto is thus a fascinating look at a genius in transition. Our soloist, Chopin-specialist Louis Lortie, will bring out all the riches of this piano masterwork. Igor Stravinsky enjoyed remarkable success and support in Paris, but kept strong ties to his roots. His music for the ballet Petrushka, based on Russia’s version of Punch and Judy, premiered in Paris in 1911, with the immortal Nijinsky in the title role.

 
2:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Week 2

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Louis Lortie - Piano
Chopin - Piano Concerto No. 1
INTERMISSION
Stravinsky - Petrushka

On our second visit to Paris, Yannick and the Orchestra feature two brilliant musical expats who made the French capital their home, while never forgetting their native land. Frédéric Chopin wrote his Piano Concerto No. 1 before he left Poland in 1830; political upheaval drove him to Paris, where he remained for the rest of his life, dazzling the city (and audiences and critics throughout the world) with his extraordinary performing and composing skills. The Concerto is thus a fascinating look at a genius in transition. Our soloist, Chopin-specialist Louis Lortie, will bring out all the riches of this piano masterwork. Igor Stravinsky enjoyed remarkable success and support in Paris, but kept strong ties to his roots. His music for the ballet Petrushka, based on Russia’s version of Punch and Judy, premiered in Paris in 1911, with the immortal Nijinsky in the title role.

 
8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Week 2

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Louis Lortie - Piano
Chopin - Piano Concerto No. 1
INTERMISSION
Stravinsky - Petrushka

On our second visit to Paris, Yannick and the Orchestra feature two brilliant musical expats who made the French capital their home, while never forgetting their native land. Frédéric Chopin wrote his Piano Concerto No. 1 before he left Poland in 1830; political upheaval drove him to Paris, where he remained for the rest of his life, dazzling the city (and audiences and critics throughout the world) with his extraordinary performing and composing skills. The Concerto is thus a fascinating look at a genius in transition. Our soloist, Chopin-specialist Louis Lortie, will bring out all the riches of this piano masterwork. Igor Stravinsky enjoyed remarkable success and support in Paris, but kept strong ties to his roots. His music for the ballet Petrushka, based on Russia’s version of Punch and Judy, premiered in Paris in 1911, with the immortal Nijinsky in the title role.

 
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8:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Week 3

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Choong-Jin Chang - Viola
Berlioz - Harold in Italy
INTERMISSION
Ravel - Alborada del gracioso
Ravel - Rapsodie espagnole
Ravel - Bolero
Fauré - Pavane

Our final visit to Paris celebrates two composers who reached outside their rich musical milieu to find inspiration around the Mediterranean. Hector Berlioz’s Harold in Italy, inspired by Lord Byron’s poetry, was written for the devilishly talented Niccolò Paganini. He decided the viola part wasn’t prominent enough, and rejected the piece. His loss is the music world’s gain; the work is now at the heart of the viola repertoire. Our principal viola, Choong-Jin Chang, steps out front to shine in this wonderful piece. From Italy to Spain, a frequent creative wellspring for Maurice Ravel (his parents both had Spanish roots): Alborada del gracioso uses Spanish musical themes; Rapsodie espagnole celebrates all things Spanish, especially music and dance; and then there’s the stunning Bolero. Deceptively simple, yet utterly compelling, it was a sensational success at its Paris Opera premiere in 1928 and brings our Paris sojourn to an ecstatic finale.

 
2:00 PM

The Paris Festival: Week 3

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Choong-Jin Chang - Viola
Berlioz - Harold in Italy
INTERMISSION
Ravel - Alborada del gracioso
Ravel - Rapsodie espagnole
Ravel - Bolero
Fauré - Pavane

Our final visit to Paris celebrates two composers who reached outside their rich musical milieu to find inspiration around the Mediterranean. Hector Berlioz’s Harold in Italy, inspired by Lord Byron’s poetry, was written for the devilishly talented Niccolò Paganini. He decided the viola part wasn’t prominent enough, and rejected the piece. His loss is the music world’s gain; the work is now at the heart of the viola repertoire. Our principal viola, Choong-Jin Chang, steps out front to shine in this wonderful piece. From Italy to Spain, a frequent creative wellspring for Maurice Ravel (his parents both had Spanish roots): Alborada del gracioso uses Spanish musical themes; Rapsodie espagnole celebrates all things Spanish, especially music and dance; and then there’s the stunning Bolero. Deceptively simple, yet utterly compelling, it was a sensational success at its Paris Opera premiere in 1928 and brings our Paris sojourn to an ecstatic finale.

 
7:30 PM

160th Anniversary Concert

7:30 PM, Academy of Music
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Martin Short - Special Guest Artist
James Alexander - Creative Director

Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin and special guest artist Martin Short will dazzle you in a spectacular evening of music and resplendent dining, all in support of the Grand Old Lady of Locust Street. For details about the 160th Academy of Music Anniversary Concert and Ball call the Academy of Music Restoration Fund Office at 215.893.1978.
 
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Calendar

Format: 2017-01-22