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7:00 PM

Disney's Fantasia⁠—Live in Concert

7:00 PM, Verizon Hall
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Aram Demirjian - Conductor
Bach/orch. Stokowski - Toccata and Fugue in D minor (Orchestra only)
Tchaikovsky - Excerpts from Suite No. 1 from The Nutcracker
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 5
Stravinsky - Excerpts from Suite from The Firebird
Ponchielli - “Dance of the Hours,” from La Gioconda
Debussy/orch. Stokowski - “Clair de lune,” from Suite bergamasque (Orchestra only)
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”)
Dukas - The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

Fantasia is a pinnacle of cinematic art, and a landmark in The Philadelphia Orchestra's incredible tradition of innovation. This groundbreaking 1940 collaboration between the visionary genius Walt Disney and the Orchestra's commanding maestro Leopold Stokowski has never lost its capacity to move, delight, and astonish audiences all over the world. There is simply nothing like a live performance of this classic by your Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts ©. All rights reserved.

 
7:00 PM

Disney's Fantasia⁠—Live in Concert

7:00 PM, Verizon Hall
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Aram Demirjian - Conductor
Bach/orch. Stokowski - Toccata and Fugue in D minor (Orchestra only)
Tchaikovsky - Excerpts from Suite No. 1 from The Nutcracker
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 5
Stravinsky - Excerpts from Suite from The Firebird
Ponchielli - “Dance of the Hours,” from La Gioconda
Debussy/orch. Stokowski - “Clair de lune,” from Suite bergamasque (Orchestra only)
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”)
Dukas - The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

Fantasia is a pinnacle of cinematic art, and a landmark in The Philadelphia Orchestra's incredible tradition of innovation. This groundbreaking 1940 collaboration between the visionary genius Walt Disney and the Orchestra's commanding maestro Leopold Stokowski has never lost its capacity to move, delight, and astonish audiences all over the world. There is simply nothing like a live performance of this classic by your Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts ©. All rights reserved.

 
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2:00 PM

Disney's Fantasia⁠—Live in Concert

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Aram Demirjian - Conductor
Bach/orch. Stokowski - Toccata and Fugue in D minor (Orchestra only)
Tchaikovsky - Excerpts from Suite No. 1 from The Nutcracker
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 5
Stravinsky - Excerpts from Suite from The Firebird
Ponchielli - “Dance of the Hours,” from La Gioconda
Debussy/orch. Stokowski - “Clair de lune,” from Suite bergamasque (Orchestra only)
Beethoven - Excerpts from Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”)
Dukas - The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

Fantasia is a pinnacle of cinematic art, and a landmark in The Philadelphia Orchestra's incredible tradition of innovation. This groundbreaking 1940 collaboration between the visionary genius Walt Disney and the Orchestra's commanding maestro Leopold Stokowski has never lost its capacity to move, delight, and astonish audiences all over the world. There is simply nothing like a live performance of this classic by your Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts ©. All rights reserved.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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4:00 PM

Martin Luther King, Jr., Tribute Concert

4:00 PM, Girard College Chapel
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Sterling Elliott - Cello
Charlotte Blake Alston - Speaker
Philadelphia High School for CAPA Choir
B. Lauren Thomas - Director
Coleman - Umoja, Anthem for Unity
Lalo - Third movement from Cello Concerto
Handel/arr. Warren - “Hallelujah,” from Handel’s Messiah: A Soulful Celebration
Oliveros - “The Tuning Meditation,” from Four Meditations for Orchestra
Barber - Adagio for Strings
Smallwood - "Total Praise"
Johnson - "Lift Every Voice and Sing"

Join Your Philadelphia Orchestra in honoring the life and work of the great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and in celebrating our Philadelphia community, with the uniting power of music.

The concert is free but tickets are required. Seating is general admission and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets do not guarantee entry, and there is a limit of four per household. Doors will open at 3:30 PM.

 
 
 
7:30 PM

BeethovenNOW: Yefim Bronfman

7:30 PM, Academy of Music
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Yefim Bronfman - Piano
Fung - Dust Devils
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 4
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Rachmaninoff - Symphony No. 3

The Orchestra returns to the Academy of Music for its first subscription concerts since moving to Verizon Hall in 2001. It's a fitting venue for Rachmaninoff's nostalgic, romantic Symphony No. 3, premiered by the composer's cherished Philadelphians in 1936 on that very same stage, with Leopold Stokowski conducting. The gentle, lone piano chords that open the Fourth Concerto were a radical construct when Beethoven premiered the wide-ranging and emotional work in 1808. Yefim Bronfman says he's always been drawn to its tenderness.

 
2:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Yefim Bronfman

2:00 PM, Academy of Music
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Yefim Bronfman - Piano
Fung - Dust Devils
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 4
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Rachmaninoff - Symphony No. 3

The Orchestra returns to the Academy of Music for its first subscription concerts since moving to Verizon Hall in 2001. It's a fitting venue for Rachmaninoff's nostalgic, romantic Symphony No. 3, premiered by the composer's cherished Philadelphians in 1936 on that very same stage, with Leopold Stokowski conducting. The gentle, lone piano chords that open the Fourth Concerto were a radical construct when Beethoven premiered the wide-ranging and emotional work in 1808. Yefim Bronfman says he's always been drawn to its tenderness.

 
7:00 PM

Academy of Music 163rd Anniversary Concert

7:00 PM, Academy of Music
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
John Lithgow - Special Guest Artist
Mozart - Overture to The Magic Flute
Elgar - Pomp and Circumstance, Op. 39, No. 1
Ravel - “Laideronnette, Empress of Pagodes,” from Mother Goose Suite
Mr. Lithgow in performance with The Philadelphia Orchestra
Stravinsky - Selections from Suite from The Firebird

Celebrate the rich history of the home where The Philadelphia Orchestra first made its sound famous—the glorious “Grand Old Lady of Locust Street.”

 
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2:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Yefim Bronfman

2:00 PM, Academy of Music
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Yefim Bronfman - Piano
Fung - Dust Devils
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 4
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Rachmaninoff - Symphony No. 3

The Orchestra returns to the Academy of Music for its first subscription concerts since moving to Verizon Hall in 2001. It's a fitting venue for Rachmaninoff's nostalgic, romantic Symphony No. 3, premiered by the composer's cherished Philadelphians in 1936 on that very same stage, with Leopold Stokowski conducting. The gentle, lone piano chords that open the Fourth Concerto were a radical construct when Beethoven premiered the wide-ranging and emotional work in 1808. Yefim Bronfman says he's always been drawn to its tenderness.

 
 
 
 
7:30 PM

BeethovenNOW: Daniil Trifonov

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Daniil Trifonov - Piano
Boulanger - Of a Sad Evening
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 1
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Farrenc - Symphony No. 2

Daniil Trifonov, the Orchestra's Grammy-winning recording partner, returns for four performances. Amplifying the programs are two underappreciated works by formidable women composers: Lili Boulanger, the first woman to win, in 1913, the prestigious Prix de Rome composition prize, and Louise Farrenc, whose Symphony No. 2 dialogues with Beethoven, and leaves us asking why her works are not a more integral part of the canon today.

 
2:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Daniil Trifonov

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Daniil Trifonov - Piano
Boulanger - Of a Sad Evening
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 1
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Farrenc - Symphony No. 2

Daniil Trifonov, the Orchestra's Grammy-winning recording partner, returns for four performances. Amplifying the programs are two underappreciated works by formidable women composers: Lili Boulanger, the first woman to win, in 1913, the prestigious Prix de Rome composition prize, and Louise Farrenc, whose Symphony No. 2 dialogues with Beethoven, and leaves us asking why her works are not a more integral part of the canon today.

 
 

Calendar

Format: 2020-01-23